Pioneer in Education for African Americans and Children

Abolitionist, educator, philanthropist and suffragist from the village of Sherwood in Cayuga County, New York, Emily Howland was an avid supporter of education for women and African American children. She founded and financially supported fifty schools for emancipated blacks and taught in several of them. She donated the land and financial backing to build a school for black children in her hometown, which later became Emily Howland School.

Early Years
Emily …Read More...

First Lady for Her Bachelor Uncle, James Buchanan

Harriet Lane (1830-1903) was the niece of lifelong bachelor and 15th United States President James Buchanan. At age 26 she moved into the White House and acted as First Lady of the United States from 1857 to 1861, one of the few women to hold that position while not being married to the president. Known as the Democratic Queen, Lane was admired for her beauty and vivaciousness, and she used her position …Read More...

Jewish Civil War Nurse and Philanthropist

Rosanna Dyer was born February 26, 1809 in Germany. Her parents, Isabella and John M. Dyer, moved the family to Baltimore when Rosanna was very young. Her family was very active in the Baltimore Jewish community, and were part of the group that built Baltimore's first synagogue.

At age 16, Rosanna married Joseph Osterman, a Dutch-born merchant and silversmith. In 1838, after experiencing some financial reversals, the Ostermans moved to Galveston to establish a …Read More...

Civil War Nurse, Educator and Humanitarian

Clara Barton - pioneer teacher, government clerk and nurse - is one of the most honored women in American history. She began teaching school at a time when most teachers were men. She was among the first women to gain employment in the federal government. Barton risked her life when she was nearly 40 years old to bring supplies and support to soldiers in the field during the Civil War. Then, at age 60, …Read More...

Advocate for the Soldiers' Home for Civil War Veterans

For several years before the Civil War, Delphine Baker devoted herself to the advancement of women. She had no connection with the Women's Rights Movement, but advocated for better education for women. To that end, she traveled in many of the western states, giving lectures and influencing the public mind.

Delphine Baker was born in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, in 1828, and she lived in New England during her early youth. Her …Read More...