Highest Ranking Soldier Killed at Gettysburg

Pennsylvania native John Reynolds was a West Point graduate, and soon after the American Civil War began, he was promoted to brigadier general. During the 1862 Peninsula Campaign in Virginia; Reynolds was taken prisoner by the Confederates but was released some weeks later. After his return to the army, Reynolds was named commander of the Union Army's First Corps. He received the rank of major general on November 29, 1862.

In late June 1863, …Read More...

Phoebe Couzins: Pioneer Lawyer and Suffragist

In the 1870s, Phoebe Couzins (1842-1913) became the third or fourth female lawyer in the United States and a popular public speaker in support of women's rights. After her father died in 1887, the U.S. government appointed her as the first female in the U.S. Marshal Service, and she finished her father's term of service.

Early Years

Phoebe Wilson Couzins was born September 8, 1842 in St. Louis, Missouri to John E.D. …Read More...

Daughter of Confederate President Jefferson Davis

As the daughter of President of the Confederate States of America Jefferson Davis, Varina Anne 'Winnie' Davis appeared with her father at numerous Confederate veterans' events after the American Civil War and became known as 'Daughter of the Confederacy.' She also authored two novels and wrote for Joseph Pulitzer's New York World newspaper.

Early Years
Varina Anne Davis was born June 27, 1864 in the White House of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia …Read More...

Wife of General and President Ulysses S. Grant

Julia Boggs Dent was born January 26, 1826 at White Haven plantation near St. Louis, Missouri, the fifth of seven children. Her parents were Frederick and Ellen Dent, who owned about thirty black slaves; they refused to free them only when the law required it. From about 1831 through 1836, Julia attended the Misses Mauros' co-ed, one-room boarding school in St. Louis. Growing up at White Haven, she fished, rode horses, and …Read More...

Vivandieres first appeared in France as women who were part of a regiment and sold spirits (an alcoholic drink) and other items and cared for the sick. These women wore uniforms similar to that of the regiment in which they served, and they displayed great courage by giving immediate medical assistance to the wounded in the midst of battle. When the Civil War began in 1861, hundreds of American women were ready to brave those same conditions for the Union …Read More...