Portrait Artist and American Impressionist

Lilla Cabot Perry is best-known as an American Impressionist painter, creating landscapes and portraits in a free form manner. Impressionism is characterized by loose brushwork and vivid colors. She was greatly influenced by Ralph Waldo Emerson's philosophies, and her friendships with Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro greatly influenced her work. Pissarro acted as a father figure to all four major Post-Impressionists: Vincent van Gogh, Georges Seurat, Paul Gaugin, and Paul Cezanne.

Image: Self Portrait (1890s)
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Painter of Politicians and Officials in Washington DC

Cornelia Adele Fassett was an American artist known for her political paintings and portraits. Her most famous work, The Florida Case Before the Electoral Commission (1878), now hangs in the United States Capitol. Her paintings of the Supreme Court and Justices are in the art collection of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Image: Cornelia Adele Strong Fassett
Between 1865 and 1880
Library of Congress

Personal Life
Cornelia Adele Strong was …Read More...

First Woman to Exhibit Her Art at the Paris Salon

Elizabeth Gardner was among the first wave of Americans who sought art training in Paris during and after the Civil War. She was the first American woman to exhibit a painting at the Paris Salon, and the first woman awarded a gold medal there. Her prize-winning painting The Farmer's Daughter sold April 23, 2010 at Sotheby's New York for $494,500, significantly more than the $200,000 to $300,000 estimate.

Image: The …Read More...

African American Folk Artist in the South

Harriet Powers is one of the best African American quilt makers in the South in the Civil War era. Although only two of her older quilts have survived, she is now nationally recognized. Using the applique technique, Powers told stories with her quilts, depicting scenes from the Bible and events in American history.

Image: Harriet Powers' Bible Quilt (1886)
Eleven scenes from Bible stories
Patchwork and applique

Early Years
Harriet …Read More...